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HSBC and CloudBees team up to provide secure software delivery

This deal will improve productivity for 23,000 developers working for CloudBees

HSBC has signed a fresh multi-year agreement with software delivery automation specialist CloudBees to improve productivity for 23,000 developers working for the multinational, according to media reports. The agreement includes all components of the CloudBees platform including continuous integration, continuous delivery, release orchestration, and feature management capabilities and the service will be made available to all 40 million customers.

Ian Haynes, CTO shared services and cloud at HSBC told the media, “As customers shift more and more of their banking online, the software is at the heart of everything we do at HSBC. We are digitising the bank and innovating faster to improve the customer experience while prioritising security and compliance. We’ve chosen CloudBees because standardisation and automation across our entire software delivery system will enable our developers to get new digital products and services into our customers’ hands quickly and securely.”

While the terms of this deal were not discussed, this news comes at a time when the banking giant is aggressively revamping its global IT practices around the globe. Last year, the bank vowed to slash software costs by $900 million and broader IT costs by $1.2 billion by 2022.

Both HSBC and CloudBees have a long-standing relationship where HSBC also became a strategic investor in the company in 2019. This deal comes after HSBC faced massive challenges globally with software delivery. HSBC follows a hybrid cloud environment, which they believe is necessary for simplifying and unifying software release automation across the entire global organisation.

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